Categories
Advice. Opinions. Conversation.

The Shift: Issue #23

Frazzled Café: it’s ok, to not be ok; Creating community; Support for creative workers; Career development tips; #NaNoWriMo.

Feeling frazzled? I am. Here we go again with #lockdown2 which all feels a bit pointless as it’s not working. I’ve had my mother ranting down the phone this week. “You can’t stop a virus spreading! We’re just kicking the tin can down the road. They should sack the Sage lot! I’m listening to the other scientists…”

The Great Barrington Declaration is back on Google – big tech has no place censoring debate. It takes a holistic approach – we can’t focus on one virus at the expense of everything else – the economy, our mental health. Partial protection seems like the sensible option – protect the elderly and vulnerable and let the rest of us get on with it. There has to be a better way than full lockdown. We should at least have more public debate on this.

I’ve signed up to join the Frazzled Café, a charity providing a safe space to share your stories. “A place to connect with others to help us cope with the overwhelming stresses of modern life. A place where it’s ok, to not be ok,” i.e. to vent your frustrations!!! See more.

Categories
Advice. Opinions. Conversation.

The Shift: Issue #8

Back in Business

Did you go out yesterday? Super Saturday. It was raining here, so I didn’t bother. Not in the mood for shopping or being in a crowded pub, so I stayed home and made some calls. It’s been a busy week, and I had to take my daughter to Heathrow on Tuesday. She’s spending the rest of the summer in Sardinia with her dad, so I’m getting used to being on my own again.

A friend made a comment the other day about being an unpaid skivvy and how she’s glad to get back to work (she runs a vegan café and has been doing takeaways). I know how she feels. I’ve enjoyed spending more time with my daughter and having a co-working buddy, but it’s been hard work. Lots of shopping, cooking and cleaning on top of my paid work, which women tend to do more of.

I need a break. 

A friend said her neighbours are having an existential crisis about having jobs with no meaning. The pandemic has polarised jobs into two camps: essential and nonessential. We’re celebrating key workers—teachers, doctors, nurses, supermarket staff and delivery drivers because they’re out there doing important (and visible) jobs. It’s easy to feel demoralised and fed up if you’ve been furloughed, worrying about redundancy, or doing less visible work like IT, marketing and social media.

If you’re feeling that way there are some good tips in this piece by The Enterprisers Project. Read more